ArduCAM NOIR Raspberry Pi camera with Motorized IR Cut Filter

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Background

Raspberry pi camera has both color version pi camera board and NoIR version pi camera board. So let’s take a look at the difference between these two types of camera. The color version pi camera has 650nm IR cut filter on top of the sensor, so it can only sensitive to visible light like human eyes. While the NoIR version pi camera also called IR filter removed pi camera which doesn’t have 650nm IR cut filter on top of the sensor, and can sensitive all spectrum of light including ultraviolet light and near infrared light which cannot be seen by humans. So people will think NoIR pi camera is better than the standard color pi camera, because it is sensitive to all spectrum rather than visible light. Yes, it is good, but it depends. The problem of this effect is that the color reproduction is drastically affected.
Unlike your eyes, camera sensors can detect “near infrared” light that just outside the range of the human eye. The image below shows the result.

The plants in this view reflect more infrared than green light so they appear pink in daylight.
To make the image more akin to what humans can see, most cameras are fitted with an infrared-cut filter which only allows visible light to pass through, reflecting unwanted infrared. This is where standard color version pi camera used for.

Motorized (Switchable) infrared-cut filters

There are some instances where capturing infrared light is an advantage. In low-light conditions, cameras capture as much light as possible to produce brighter images, regardless of color. For this reason, some entry-level night-vision cameras don’t feature a cut filter, instead capturing infrared light from on-board LEDs at night at the expense of true color reproduction during the daytime.
The optimum solution is to use a switchable infrared-cut filter. In daylight, the filter covers the sensor to provide color footage, while at night the filter opens for a brighter image. In industry terms, these cameras are known as day/night or true day/night cameras.
These cameras can be combined with infrared lamps which are much more discreet than conventional white-light lighting, since the light produced can’t be seen by the human eye.

Solution

Sometimes you need the camera to work on both daylight and dark (night time) conditions, like the IP-based security camera. ArduCAM pi cameras now feature a motorized IR-cut filter on NoIR pi camera board, the IR-cut can be switched on in the daylight and can be switched off at night, and cooperated with IR light source for night vision. The highlight of this motorized IR-cut mechanism is no additional cable needed between the Raspberry Pi board and camera board.

ArduCAM pi camera with motorized IR cut filter

First we have to edit the config.txt file

sudo nano /boot/config.txt

Add this line at the end of the config.txt file, save and reboot.

disable_camera_led=1

Then use our provide python script to take normal image with IR-cut on and night vision image with IR-cut off. Using the following commands there are two pictures captured.

cd piCamLed
sudo python ./RPI_camera_IR_CUT_NOIR.py
sudo python ./RPI_camera_IR_CUT_IR.py

Software Download

Demo software can be downloaded from here.

The GotchaCAM Portable DIY Wifi Camera Based Travel and Home Security and Surveillance System

Introduction

The GotchaCAM Portable Travel and Home Security and Surveillance System consists of the ArduCAM CC3200 Uno and the software from the book “Home Security System DIY PRO using Android and TI CC3200 SimpleLink” by Robert Chin. Both are available
for purchase on major sites like Amazon in US.

The recommended way to purchase the hardware for this system is by buying the “ArduCAM CC3200 UNO DIY Wifi Portable Security Spy Ghost Hunter Camera Starter Kit” that is available on Amazon. This provides you with all the hardware you will need. Continue reading “The GotchaCAM Portable DIY Wifi Camera Based Travel and Home Security and Surveillance System” »

8MP Sony IMX219 Camera for Raspberry Pi

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Introduction

ArduCAM team just released a 8MP Raspberry Pi compatible camera based on the same Sony IMX219 image sensor. It’s capable of 3280 x 2464 pixel static images, and also supports 1080p30, 720p60 and 640x480p90 video. It attaches to Pi by the dedicated standard CSi interface.

It is the supplementary for Raspberry Pi offical camera in order to fulfill the demands for different lens mount, field of view (FOV) and depth of the field (DOF) as well as the motorized IR cut filter for both daylight and night vision. Contact us for further customization.

Features

  • Sensor type: Sony IMX219 Color CMOS 8-megapixel
  • Sensor size: 3.674 x 2.760 mm (1/4″ format)
  • Pixel Count: 3280 x 2464 (active pixels) 3296 x 2512 (total pixels)
  • Pixel Size: 1.12 x 1.12 um
  • Lens: M12/CS mount customizable, telephoto to fisheye
  • Angle of View: customizable
  • Video: 1280×720 binned and cropped up to 60fps
  • 1080P cropped up to 30fps
  • 1640×1232 full FOV binned mode, up to 30fps
  • 3280×2464 full FOV, allegedly 0.1fps to 15fps
  • Board size: 36 x 36 mm
  • IR Sensitive: Optional motorized IR cut filter

ArduCAM porting for Raspberry Pi

As ArduCAM is general purpose camera, it can be used on any micro controller platform not limited to Arduino, and now ArduCAM team port the code library to Raspberry Pi family.

Thanks to the uniform 40 pin GPIO header design makes it possible to adopt ArduCAM and its mutli camera adapter board for Pi B+, Pi 2, Pi 3 and even Pi ZERO. Due to the benefit of onboard frame buffer and DMA transfer directly from sensor to frame buffer, make the ArduCAM outstanding of taking photos simultaneously.

With ArduCAM porting for Raspberry pi, you can use more cameras on Raspberry Pi together with native Raspberry Pi camera.

 

Arduino Panorama Photography with ArduCAM

Panoramic photograph is a technique of photography, using specialized equipment or software, that captures images with elongated fields of view. It is sometimes known as wide format photography. In order to create panorama photos, you have to take several photos from different view point and stitching them afterwards. There are basically two ways to get these photos, one is to use one camera and shooting from different position, the other is to use multiple cameras and shooting at the same time. The later has better stitching result than the former and requires less photography experience, but more complex hardware equipment.

With the hardware nature of ArduCAM shields especially the ArduCAM-mini and Multi-Adapter board for Raspberry, you can connect multiple cameras to a single Arduino or Raspberry Pi board, even shoot the cameras at the same time. In this demonstration we will use 4 ArduCAM mini 5MP with its adapter board and an Arduino UNO R3 board to create your own panoramas or virtual tours. Continue reading “Arduino Panorama Photography with ArduCAM” »

ArduCAM now Supports ESP8266 Arduino Board with WIFI Websocket Camera Demo

It is good news to hear that the Arduino IDE support was announced on the ESP8266 community forum, the source code can be found from . It is more than another Arduino board, but can be thought as a Arduino combined with a WIFI shield. With faster CPU speed and much smaller form of factor, most important the less than $10USD price is more attractive, you are worth to try although there are also some limitations. Setup is fairly simple with downloads for Linux, OS X, and Windows. More detail setup can be found from adafruit guide. Continue reading “ArduCAM now Supports ESP8266 Arduino Board with WIFI Websocket Camera Demo” »